McCarthy Rethought

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The traditional narrative of history depicts Senator Joseph McCarthy as a demagogue, who used a conspiratorial anti-communistic worldview to justify an erosion of civil rights, political repression and risked an escalation of the Cold War. Being that McCarthyism went against the notions of American idealism and faded away with the end of Senator McCarthy’s creditability, it is thought to be simply a deviation of traditional American history and therefore cannot be considered applicable to modern politics.

Although this may be true, upon reflection I have come question this perception, as a conspiracy mindset has always been apart of America and McCarthyism was simply another example of this tendency occurring. Furthermore, I contend that it is inaccurate to view McCarthy as paranoid madman who had no reason to make the claims that he was making.

The American Inclination for Conspiracy

According to Richard Hofstadter, this ‘paranoid styled’ thinking has expressed itself under different guises throughout history, with the US being no exception. However, I would suggest that this national characteristic is not surprising, as the American Revolution itself was a scheme against the British Empire. I would add that by being born from a conspiracy, the psyche of America was imbedded with the possibility of subversion occurring is some form or another: Freemasons, Catholicism, international socialism or capitalism, the Illuminati and the Elders of Zion protocols (Hofstadter 1966, p.6).

An early example of the paranoid thinking gaining a foothold into America can be found in the Anti-Masonic movement. It was believed to be an international conspiratorial network that required a separate system of loyalty, jurisdiction and obligations and punishments (Hofstadter 1966, p.16) that went against the constitutionalism of the US Republic. In reaction to this perception, the rise of anti-masonry ascended into a national movement (Hofstadter 1966, p.15).

In order to explain how such thining could gain traction, it required seeing history as the motive force in historical events (Hofstadter 1966, p.29) and possess an apocalyptic streak and thus constantly living at the turning point (Hofstadter 1966, p.30). Therefore Man is locked into a battle for survival with an enemy that manipulates and profits from history by manufacturing crisis, depressions, wars and disasters (Hofstadter 1966, p.32). Interestingly, it would appear that this enemy is an ideological doppelganger to the patriot: the enemy is a cosmopolitan intellectual that is ruthless in persecuting its agenda and the patriot will need to outdo him in scholarship and information and will also act with zealotry in purging the nation of subversive influences (Hofstadter 1966, p.32). However, it is important to realize that actual secret societies existed that potentially threatened civil order, such as Freemasonry (Hofstadter 1966, p.36). Therefore it is very plausible that some conspiracies can be fact, not theory.

It would appear that Senator McCarthy was no different for his ant-Masonic predecessors in his paranoid thinking, as indicated by his speeches where he spoke of a ‘great conspiracy so immense as to dwarf any pervious such venture in the history of man (Hofstadter 1966, p.7).

McCarthy Rethought

The aftermath of WWII saw a sickly FDR sign over Poland to Stalin, Soviet Agent Igor Gouzenko defects and named 22 people in a spy ring that passed documents to Stalin. By 1949 China fell to Mao and America’s major ally, Chiang-Kai-Shek exiled (Buchanan 1990, p. 92). It was these events that persuaded McCarthy that a massive communistic conspiracy was afoot.

Once establishing himself as a force on Capital Hill, a chilling affect occurred within American government: departments downsized, diplomats feared their mail being opened, rumours flowered, telephones tapped, and due to low morale of the civil service, the quality and quantity of applicants became substandard (Schrecker 1999, p. 371). Furthermore, McCarthyism led to a hard-line attitude, which fostered dishonesty and unrealistic policies that narrowed the debate on forging policy (Schrecker 1999, p. 377)

However, the damage of McCarthyism was nowhere as extensive than in Hollywood the Civil Rights Movements. Being that Communism supported racial equality, McCarthyism was forced to assault Civil Rights Movement by anathematised individuals and destroyed institutions and thus the remaining groups were small and conservative and thus posed little challenged to the norm (Schrecker 1999, p. 390). On the cultural front, McCarthyism entered Hollywood and saw a purging and blacklisted talented personnel by denying them licenses to those who affiliated or sympathetic to communism. Furthermore, it dictated content and the genre took a conservative outlook: the good/bad guy Westerns, unthinking patriotism of war movies and Bible epics. Moreover, undesirable elements were suppressed such as sexual content and blacks, workers and uppity women were kept off screen (Schrecker 1999, p. 399).

However, I argue that if McCarthy had any doubt of his actions, they were dismissed and replaced with vindication by the Hiss case. State Department diplomat Alger Hiss was accursed being a Soviet agent and after he angrily and categorically denied the charges. After the press major political figures, such as Eleanor Roosevelt, Dwight Eisenhower and John Foster Dulles public supported Hiss, it was Richard Nixon’s confrontation with Hiss and discovering documents found on his farm that proved him guilty (Herman 2000, p. 87).

Despite the suppression of civil rights and the constrained affects of McCarthyism, I assert that it is incorrect to state that McCarthy was a loathsome, isolated political figure. Evidence of this is reflected in that not a single Gallup Poll of that era showed even 1% viewed anti-communistic extremism as national problem. Even the apostles of American liberalism, the Kennedy Family, embraced him: Joe Kennedy supported him, Kennedy girls dated him, RFK worked for him and JFK walked out in disgust with a speaker stated that Harvard never produced a McCarthy or Hiss, stating ‘How dare you couple the name of Joe McCarthy with that of a Traitor!’ (Buchanan 1990, p.90).

I would state that McCarthy was a patriot that possessed the good intentions of ridding America of a hostile subversive force. But it appears that in his quest to do so, his paranoid thinking unheeded the Nietzschean warning about being careful in fighting monsters and became one himself. This is reflected in his embracement of the same authoritarian tactics and suppression that communism had adopted.

Conclusion

In conclusion, the idea of ‘paranoid thinking’ has proven to be a natural element to the American character. This explains how McCarthy gained and maintained so much support by the public and other key political figures. It appears that McCarthyism was not an anomaly to America, but was actually as American as Apple Pie.

Bibliography

Buchanan, P (1990) Right from the Beginning, Little Brown and Company, United States

Herman, A (2000) Joseph McCarthy: Reexamining the Life and Legacy of America’s Most Hated Senator, The Free Press, United States

Richard Hofstadter, “The paranoid style in American politics” The paranoid style in American politics, and other essays London: Cape, 1966.

Ellen Schrecker, Many Are the Crimes: McCarthyism in America, Princeton University Press, 368-415

Recommended Viewing – 

The Truth About McCarthyism: Modern Parallels

Why did the American Republican North champion Anti-slavery and Free Labor?

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The traditional narrative of history dictates that during the American Civil War, the Republican North sought the fulfilment of the founding principle of ‘All men are created equal’. While this is true, I view this as a simplified narration of history, as it omits the impact of the Market Revolution and the reasoning as to why the Republicans became the champions of natural law. This will explored by using the writings of Society, Politics and the Market Revolution 1815-1848 by Sean Wilentz and Eric Foner’s Free Labor: The Republicans and Northern Society.

The Transformational Power of the Market Revolution

The residuum of the Market Revolution cannot be understated as it fundamentally changed the economic, social and political makeup of the United States and ultimately set the battlelines of the American Civil War. I would argue that this is important, as the history of the Civil War was not a predestined occurrence and could have easily developed under alternative circumstances. For example, the beliefs of the Northern and Southern states or the political parties could have been inverted and thus history rewritten.

According to Wilentz, Americans were mostly a rural people who worked in agriculture with the majority working on small-time family farms (Wilentz 1997, p. 63). This carried a distinct way of life that upheld barter exchange, self-sufficiency and communalism as well as middle-class respectability and domesticity (Wilentz 1997, p. 63). It was with the innovative technology of transport that made land settlement and trade easier and therefore manufacture industrialization and commercialization could occurred, which intensified productive capacity (Wilentz 1997, p. 63) and allow the rapid increase of the output of raw materials and finished goods (Wilentz 1997, p. 63).

Interestingly, this economic revolution was not a national metamorphosis, as it materialized differently within the Northern and Southern states. The North seemed to embrace such changes and saw to the rise of professionalism with manufacturers, merchants, and lawyers. The aftereffect however saw the impersonality of work and the decline of family and communalism (Wilentz 1997, p. 64). However, the industrial revolution saw the rise of the Cotton Kingdom within the American South and thus the spread of plantation slavery with Southerners being reluctant or outright hostile to the Northern economic and social changes (Wilentz 1997, p. 66). By relaying on the plantation economics, the South adopted the raison d’être for slavery of civilizing black slaves (Wilentz 1997, p. 66). Therefore, they required the rejection of the northern notions of liberal individualism (Wilentz 1997, p. 67). In doing so, they saw to the creation of a social organization and understanding that saw white paternalism that entwined master-slave dynamics with familial rights and duties, which pacified slave rebelliousness (Wilentz 1997, p. 67).

The Party of Lincoln chooses sides

Due to wanting to differentiate themselves from the British counterparts, American idealism adopted the notions of republicanism and individualism. By doing so, the culture was based on protecting the commonwealth, exercising virtue and independence, maintaining a politically engaged citizenry and equal representation (Wilentz 1997, p. 71). However, it was the Market Revolution that saw the emergence of two distinct forms of American culture that were manifested in the political makeup of the Democratic and Republican parties.

Although the Republican Party was capitalistic, it supported a form of economic patriotism. As Foner argues, this meant they championed the notion of free labor and saw it as the reason for their rapid economic development as it was the source of all their wealth, progress, dignity, value and national unity (Foner 1970, 12). It was by upholding the ‘harmony of interests’ of supporting a protective tariff that safeguarded patriotic interests and the advancement of domestic labor along with protecting against cheap foreign workers (Foner 1970, 20). This contrasted with the Democratic free-traders who determined that competition with external forces would stimulate growth and avoid sluggishness (Foner 1970, 19). This was proven to be unfounded as the internal dynamics saw North Americans driven by the desire to improve their condition of life, supported and promoted the notion of social mobility and economic growth (Foner 1970, 12). Furthermore, the Republicans were also hateful towards the ‘Money Power’ of big business and economic concentration that they equated as a form of moneyed feudalism, which destroyed independence and freedom (Foner 1970, 22).

I believe this economic-social mindset of looking after their fellow Man, allowed the Republicans to be susceptible to the notions of the Second Great Awakening, which stated that in order for the Return of Christ to take place, humanity must purify itself by adopting the abolishment of slavery. I believe this was possible by Americans possessing the ‘Protestant work ethic’ that saw the Republican Party adopt the concepts of free labor and then eventually abolition. Given that the American people mostly came from Protestantism, their worldview became compatible with capitalism as it forced honesty, frugality, diligence and punctuality. By doing so, Northerners felt they were fulfilling their Christian duty by consuming the fruits of the Market Revolution (Foner 1970, 12-13). Once this developed, I suggest this worldview also allowed antislavery to be embraced, as seen with their political predecessor- the Free Soil Party. This ideological combination of Free Labor and antislavery eventually became part of the platform of the Republican Party (Wilentz 1997, p. 80). Contrastingly, the Democratic South interrupted that Man was divinely ordained and should be satisfied with his given role in life, and while under the static plantation economics, saw a hierarchical social order and fixed classes (Foner 1970, 13). I contend that it is unsurprising that the North and South had adopted their given ideological perspectives, given their religious fundamentals, economics and societal outlook.

Conclusion

In conclusion, upon reviewing the given sources, I have ascertained that it is a myth to believe the Republican North possessed an inherent moral superiority and that the South was intrinsically unethical. It was the benefits of the Market Revolution and the undercurrent of liberalism that took the North onto the path of prosperity and racial equality. If the tides of fate had been altered, with the fruits of the Market Revolution were distributed more evenly, American idealism may not have spilt and slavery may have died a natural death. Or the conflict may have occurred under different circumstances.

Bibliography

Eric Foner, Free Soil, Free Labour, Free Men: The Ideology of the Republican Party Before the Civil War, New York, Oxford University Press, 1970, Ch 1(11-39)

Sean Wilentz, “Society, Politics, and the Market Revolution, 1815-1848,” in Eric Foner, ed. The New American History, (Revised and Expanded Edition), Temple University Press, 1997, pp.61-84.

North-South Relations: Sharing Sovereignty Undermines National Sovereignty of the State?

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The impact of shared-sovereignty upon nationalism is contested within academia, wondering if it undermines, increases or transforms nation states within a globalized world. It is my contention that non-state actors have ultimately undermined national sovereignty itself.

The Historical Narrative

In order to comprehend the concept, it is best to briefly understand its foundations and its connection to neoliberalism.

During and post-WWII the economic theory of Keynesianism was championed by many Western countries. However by the 1980’s, disillusionment with interventionism arose and was replaced by the creed of neoliberalism. The Reagan-Thatcher Administrations spearheaded it: this saw privatization, deregulating industries and international free trade.[1] This saw the redefinition of public-private spheres; with ‘public’ being considered to be government and ‘private’ are corporations.[2]

By 2000, the global market was skewed towards the interests of multinational corporations with its oligopolistic completion is often constrained and aimed at controlling national governments.[3] I would suggest that this established universal corporatism.

The Corporate World

The traditional role of the state has always been a source of governance, however this has seen its power slowly usurped by non-state actors.[4]

With no alternative available, it appears that the bi-polar world was replaced by a new post-liberal order.[5] This order originates in the West, it incorporates neoliberal principals. This implies this newfound ‘Corporate State’ has taken neoliberalism to the extreme, thus transforming it into authoritarian corporatism, working through multinationals such as the IMF and transnational entities like the European Union. This means that the neoliberal concepts became imposed from an international level.[6]

The implication of the Corporate State is that authority resides in offshore institutions. This private authority usurps national legitimacy and creates rules, principals, norms and regulations that must be adopted by governments.[7] It defines and prioritizes issues and present solutions to problems along with designed, adopted and implement their own rules and regulations.[8] Furthermore, they are motivated by the avoidance of activist and NGO scrutiny, appease investors and to create a standardized operating system.[9] The concern of lack of accountability is pacified by the promise of self-regulation that even extends between firms, governments and civil society via public-private partnerships.[10]

However, I would argue that the West is unfairly demonized as transgressions also fell upon Western countries. The abovementioned entities may be superficially thought of Western, but in reality they are no longer dependent upon their home counties. They are now manifesting within a transnational networks and sharing regulation and governance.[11]

The European Example

The Eurozone is facing a breakup due to the backlash by rediscovered nationalism by various countries due to rebelling against the sovereignty-killing aspect of liberal-corporatism. The bailouts of Greece, Ireland and Spain, accompanied interest rates paid by nations on their actions, cut in spending and increase in taxation.[12] These polices were applied by the transnational institution of the IMF which saw Euro institutions collapsed by 2011 which saw the Euro-commission appoint technocratic governments such as Italy and Greece.[13]

In conclusion, by non-state actors via neoliberalism appears to have transcend nationalism itself. Furthermore, it adopted authoritarian characteristics that created a hubris that made it believe that it could regulate and police itself. As seen in the European example, by having such freedom and power the nation state has become eroded by transnational entities.

– 537 Words

Bibliography

Elbra, A.D. (2014), “Interests Need Not be Pursued if they can be Created: Private Governance in African Gold Mining”, Business and Politics, Vol.16, No.2, pp.247-266.

Haufler, V. (2006), “Global Governance and the Private Sector,” in May, C. ed., Global Corporate Power, Boulder: Lynne Rienner Publishers.

Wilks, S. (2013), The Political Power of the Business Corporation, Cheltenham: Edward Elgar, ch.7.

[1] Virginia Haufler, (2006), Global Governance and the Private Sector, Boulder: Lynne Rienner Publishers. p. 90.

[2] Virginia Haufler, (2006), Global Governance and the Private Sector, Boulder: Lynne Rienner Publishers. p. 92.

[3] Stephen Wilks, (2013), The Political Power of the Business Corporation, Cheltenham: Edward Elgar, ch.7. p. 150.

[4] Ainsley D. Elbra, (2014), Interests Need Not be Pursued if they can be Created: Private Governance in African Gold Mining, Business and Politics, Vol.16, No.2, pp.247-266. p.249.

[5] Stephen Wilks, (2013), The Political Power of the Business Corporation, Cheltenham: Edward Elgar, ch.7. p.148.

[6] Stephen Wilks, (2013), The Political Power of the Business Corporation, Cheltenham: Edward Elgar, ch.7. p.149.

[7] Ainsley D. Elbra, (2014), Interests Need Not be Pursued if they can be Created: Private Governance in African Gold Mining, Business and Politics, Vol.16, No.2, pp.247-266. p.250.

[8] Ainsley D. Elbra, (2014), Interests Need Not be Pursued if they can be Created: Private Governance in African Gold Mining, Business and Politics, Vol.16, No.2, pp.247-266. p.255.

[9] Ainsley D. Elbra, (2014), Interests Need Not be Pursued if they can be Created: Private Governance in African Gold Mining, Business and Politics, Vol.16, No.2, pp.247-266. p.259.

[10] Ainsley D. Elbra, (2014), Interests Need Not be Pursued if they can be Created: Private Governance in African Gold Mining, Business and Politics, Vol.16, No.2, pp.247-266. p.255.

[11] Stephen Wilks, (2013), The Political Power of the Business Corporation, Cheltenham: Edward Elgar, ch.7. p.166.

[12] Stephen Wilks, (2013), The Political Power of the Business Corporation, Cheltenham: Edward Elgar, ch.7. p.160.

[13] Stephen Wilks, (2013), The Political Power of the Business Corporation, Cheltenham: Edward Elgar, ch.7. p.160.

Is Economic Nationalism the Global Economic System of the Future?

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The recent upheaval within modern geopolitics is a revolt against the promises of neoliberal globalism. With the West winning the Cold War, the world seemed to be on the precipice of achieving some relative world peace, but instead it created another unequitable economic global system. I submit that neoliberal capitalism shares the same goals of and international socialism: a world standardized under a single ideology. This may initially appear controversial, but I contend that the parallels have always been present. Therefore, I argue that current geopolitics is symptomatic of a totalitarian global economic system and the way to reform is returning to the notions of economic nationalism.

In order to prove my argument, this paper will carry four pillars. Firstly, I will explain how neoliberalism was destined to descend into the abyss of totalitarianism by following the model of Marxism. Secondly, I will analyse the reasoning and promise of a US inspired neoliberal world and why it is contemptuous towards protectionism.

Thirdly, I will underline the fact that Free Trade carries the undercurrent of tyranny and is ultimately destructive. And finally, I will show the reasoning for economic nationalism and why it is returning to the forefront to public debate via former Free Trade champions and the current Trump phenomenon. 

The Genesis of Globalism

The infancy of modern globalization can be found in 19th century intellectualism with the creation of Marxist socialism. It will quickly become apparent, in regards to the nation state and protectionism, that current proponents of free market fundamentalism actually echo Marxism and therefore were always susceptible of being seduced into despotism.

According to Marxist thought, the nation state is an artificial construction by the capitalist middle class, which acts as a tool for working class domination and thus stales the historical evolution towards world communism (Shafter,1955, 41). He went on to declare that the state did not liberate people, but actually offers a different set of shackles, therefore civil society is not enough to emancipate humanity (Kasprzak, 590). Furthermore, in order for his communist revolution to succeed, it must take place globally as it would allow socialism develop more quickly (Szporluk, 1988, 47). Once this occurred, the state will disappear and become replaced by a classless society that will usher in the end of history, as there will be no classes and no class struggle and therefore no need for the State (Quiguly,1966, 380).

In regards to the capitalist system, Marx believed that an unrestricted free economy is ultimately self-destructive and thus can be weaponized against the barrier to socialism, such as: the nation state, national culture and protectionist policies. This would discredit the notion of capitalism and allow socialism to take root and eventually achieve its own brand of universalism. Marx himself, when addressing the 1848 Democratic Association of Brussels, articulated this plan by stating:

” The Protective system…is conservative, while the Free Trade system works destructively. It breaks up old nationalities and carries antagonism of proletariat and bourgeoisie to the uttermost point. In the word, the Free Trade system hastens the Social Revolution. In this revolutionary sense alone, gentlemen, I am in favour of Free Trade.” (Marx 1848)

The notion of that Karl Marx being free trade capitalist may be shocking, but it exposes that the dialectic between the two competing systems is a myth. I would submit that after claiming victory over their ideological enemy, the West unwittingly came to the same conclusions as socialism and then set out to remake the world in their own image.

The Neoliberal Utopia

The idea of liberal-capitalism sharing the same worldview as socialism may go against conventional thinking, but I contend that this is the outcome of any unipolar world, regardless of ideology. However, in order to understand how such a transformation could transpire, a comprehension of the neoliberal worldview must be investigated.

It was Friedrich Von Hayek’s Road to Serfdom that warned that tyranny was a result of government intervention into the realm of economics via central planning. This inevitably leads to the loss of individuality, freedom and classical liberalism. This would result in an oppressive society and the rise of a dictator, with the people returned to serfdom (Hayek, 1994, 24). He went on to say that authoritarian ideologies all emerge from central planning as it grants the power of the state over the individual. (Hayek, 1994, 29). This brand of economics was later made by fashionable by Milton Freidman and his Chicago School of Economics, which transformed theory into economic reality. He promoted the program of lassie-faire capitalism, which imposed the shrinking size of state bureaucracy, eliminating tariffs, removing restrictions of foreign investment, discard quotas, privatizing state-owned industries, deregulating capital markets privatisation of public assets, mass deregulation of the financial and banking sector, the cutting of tax rates and social safety nets (2009). It argued that through freedom of choice, expressed via the free market, any failing entities would naturally correct itself or go bankrupt. Those units that are artificially propped up by tariffs would liquidate the human ambition of entrepreneurship and the good work ethic. (2009). Being that the ethos of capitalism and individualism was being challenged by collectivism, the Western world naturally gravitated to such a theory. This doctrine gained global success with the fall of the Soviet Union and the declaration of the ‘End of History’ (Fukuyama, 1992). Due to the Western world employing neoliberalism when the Fall of Communism occurred, it was believed that this was the ultimate economic system. Therefore in order to achieve world peace, neoliberalism must spread across the globe. So sure of its superiority, British PM Margret Thatcher declared the ‘There Is No Alternative’ (Jenkins, 2007, 168).

This philosophy was put into practice by following the teachings of Thomas Freedman who advanced the idea of the Golden Straitjacket. Essentially, in order to survive a globalized world, a nation must don the neoliberal Golden Straightjacket. This meant free markets, regardless of domestic issues, must be accepted as the only alternative left: One road. Different speeds. But one road (Friedman, 2000, 104). If there was any doubt of neoliberalism also wished to see the end of the state, International Banker George W Ball stated that he felt frustrated and unduly redistricted by the traditional nation-state system (Buchanan, 1998, 106). I argue that such absolutism reveals a totalitarian mindset and the existence of an agreement between classical capitalism and Marxism.

The Failed Promises of Neoliberal Globalization

According to Naomi Klein’s The Shock Doctrine, when Free Trade is regimentally applied it becomes a form of ‘economic shock therapy’. An example of this ‘therapy’ came under the pretext of aiding a recovering post-Soviet Russia. When President Gorbachev approached the US for financial assistance, he was informed that he would receive no help unless he accepted the neoliberal program (2009). Although Gorbachev was hesitant about accepting such an ultimatum, he was replace the much more compliant Boris Yeltsin, who enthusiastically championed the Chicago School and saw brutal capitalism inflicted upon his own people. The aftermath saw state industries cheaply sold off and by 1992 the average Russian consumed 40% less then in 1991. A third of Russians fell below the poverty line. Furthermore, wages went unpaid for months. The reaction to this program was mass rioting and demonstrations, uncontrolled corruption along with booming organized crime (2009). I would argue that this outcome vindicated Marx’s cretic of capitalism being self-destructive, as the legacy of Yeltsin economics saw the Russian Parliament dissolved and the will of the people wanting to maintain their safety nets dismissed once again (2009).

The example of Russia losing its governmental authority to a transnational ideology is not an exclusive affair. As Susan Strange explains, the disillusion with politicians is worldwide is reaching the same extant that brought down the Soviet Union. Populist contempt is now directed at capitalistic countries and institutions along with the decline of state power. Now that States are no longer master of the markets, due to neoliberalism, the markets are now the master of states (Strange, 1996, 4). I argue that this vindicates my thesis that neoliberalism is just as destructive to nation states as Marxism had previously had been. Strange goes on to state that established liberal-capitalistic governments are now suffering a rapid loss of real authority as cultural autonomy is being rediscovered (Strange, 1996, 6).

The Great Epoch and the Return of National Protectionism

In order to understand why Marxism and its neoliberal counterpart hold such contempt for protectionism and why the push for geopolitical reform resonates with economic nationalism is to understand the strength and benefits of national sovereignty.

In order to keep geopolitical aggression at bay, a strong economic structure is essential. It was US Founding Father and first Secretary of the Treasury Alexander Hamilton who first to truly understand the relationship between economics and national sovereignty, and formulated the ‘National System of Economics’. It argued for protection, regulated trade, tariffs, subsidies and government intervention. By putting ‘America First’ the US saw its young industries protected from aggressive foreign powers and allowed time to strengthen, it created revenue generation and drove investment into infrastructure and internal improvements (Ferling, 2013, 214-215). By adopting Hamiltonian economics, the United States the prevailed as a global economic powerhouse from its Founding Fathers until the late 20th Century (Buchanan, 1998, 106). However, as previously stated, it was the battle with communism that saw US repudiate the very same brand of capitalism that ushered in its greatness. But with the creditability of neoliberal capital recently being declared bankrupt for reasons akin to the failed socialistic experiment of the Soviet Union, it appears that the current geopolitical world is now seeking a more reasonable economic system and thus gravitating towards a return to national sovereignty and protectionist policies.

The reconsideration of neoliberalism began during the aftermath of the Cold War. It was former United States Assistant Secretary of the Treasury and co-founder of the neoliberal theory of Supply-side economics; Dr Paul Craig Roberts is now a vocal critic of the dangers of stripping away the economic legacy of Hamilton. According to Roberts, Free Trade and globalization are guises of undeclared class warfare on the American middle class (Roberts, 2013, 99). This allows US corporations to dump their workers, avoid Social Security taxes, healthcare and pension provisions and offshore their factories to locations of cheap labour (Roberts, 2013, 99). It will essentially act as an instrument to deindustrialize America and recreate the horror of post-communistic Russia. Despite the best efforts by the American protectionists, their warnings were ignored. Although Putin’s Russia is an example of a protectionist nation being about to regain control of itself, being the US is still the world’s hyperpower, I would argue that the implications of American returning to protectionism is even greater. This possibility has only recently revealed itself within the 2016 President Campaign of Donald Trump.

By declaring his credo as ‘Americanism, not Globalism’, Trump exposed his sympathies for the Hamiltonian Economics. In doing so, he has mainstreamed both, patriotic capital and the cretic of Roberts, by promoting infrastructure building and attacking the apparent unfair international trade deals (Trump 2016). He declared that no longer would the US surrender it economic power and will seek renegotiating international agreements, such as the North American Free Trade Agreement and the Trade Pacific Partnership. If talks fail, he would counter by withdrawing and imposing tariffs upon nations to protect domestic industries and keep jobs within America (Trump 2016).

I would argue that regardless if Trump wins the presidency or not, given the historical levels of support he has received by the American people, I would state that economic nationalism has returned and is being seen as the way to reform and thus pacify international system. By readopting the foundations of American economics, Trump could theoretically ensure the rejection of both brands of globalism and return America into being the Shining City of a Hill and economically lead the world through inspiration and example.

Conclusion

 In conclusion, not only is the global economic system capable of reform, but the type of reform that is gaining traction is not only a rediscovery of protectionist policies but ultimately a renewed faith of the system of nation states.

 – 2029 Words

Bibliography

Buchanan, P (1998) The Great Betrayal, Little, Brown and Company, United Kingdom

Ferling, J (2013) Jefferson versus Hamilton, Bloomsbury Press, United States

Friedman, T. (2000) The Lexus and the Olive Tree, Revised edition, London: Harper Collins, Chapter 6.

Fukuyama, F (1992) End of History, Free Press, United States

Hayek, Friedrich (1994). The Road to Serfdom. University of Chicago Press

Jenkins, Simon. “Thatcher’s Legacy.” Political Studies Review (2007) Vol. 5, No 4” 161-171.

Kasprzak, Michal. “To reject nor not to reject nationalism: debating Marx and Engles’ Struggles with Nationalism 1840s-1880s.” Nationalities Papers (2012) Vol. 40, No.4: 585-606.

Marx, K 1848, “On the Question of Free Trade”, 9 January, viewed 29 August 2016, http://marxists.anu.edu.au/archive/marx/works/1848/01/09ft.htm

Quigley, C (1966) Tragedy and Hope, The Macmillan Company, United States

Roberts, C, P (2013) The End of Laissez Faire Capitalism, Clarity Press, United States.

Shafter, B (1955) Nationalism, A Harvest Book Harourt, Brace & World Inc., Unites States

Strange, S. (1996) The Retreat of the State: The Diffusion of Power in the World State, Cambridge University Press, United States.

Szporluk, R (1988) Communism & Nationalism: Karl Marx versus Friedrich List, Oxford University Press, United States

Trump D 2016, ‘Trump Gives Major Economic Policy Speech’, 08 August, viewed 28 September 2016, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k-1Dqz8Hj8g 

The Shock Doctrine 2009, DVD, Renegade Pictures, United States. Directed by Michael Whitecross.

Wolf, M. (2004), Why Globalization Works, New Haven and London: Yale University Press, chapter 10.

 

Recommended Reading 

Economic Nationalism Will Make America Great Again: Here’s How

http://www.nationaleconomicseditorial.com/2017/03/21/economic-nationalism/

 

Nigel Farage, Pauline Hanson, The Donald and Resurgence Nationalism

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The world is currently experiencing a state of geopolitical realignment, with nationalism reasserting itself as a credible alternative to the prevailing liberal-capitalist global order. This rise of neo-nationalism is a response to multiculturalism and global interdependence. Although such compunctions can be dismissed as being the fears of racist, xenophobic, authoritarian reactionaries, I argue that the renewed appreciation of the nation state is due to a reconsideration of the current socio-political orthodoxy that perceives multiculturalism and globalization as a subtle yet powerful form of forced cultural diversity and global political integration. I will argue that the resurgence of nationalisms around the world is a response to the dilution of national identity and the totalitarianism of a neo-Liberal form of globalisation. The way in which these ideas impact the world order is that the stronger the tide of globalisation the stronger the response towards fragmentation or plurality.

According to this argument this essay is separated into four sections: Firstly, in order to explain the reaction of nationalism, the stimuli of multiculturalism and the liberal world order will be examined. Secondly, the complexity of the concerns will be explored and therefore the reasons as to why the resurgence of nationalism can be understood. Thirdly, I will explain how radical populist nationalists managed to gain support by promoting themselves as champions of such ideological frameworks, as well the as the existence of a civic-national substitute that have also gained in support and could bring about an alternative world order to both globalism and ethno-nationalistic realism. Finally, the potential geopolitical world order of nationalism, born from the impact from the criticism of globalization, will be explored and how it may prove a superior principle of global order.

The Predominate World Order

Liberalism came to dominate the globe during the aftermath of the Great War. The conclusion was reached that realist-nationalism was the cause of international hostility and therefore in order to prevent further conflicts a transnational world state must be manifested. The greatest champion of this agenda was US President Woodrow Wilson, stated that all peoples are partners in world peace the creation of a general association of nations (Ikenberry 2009). History then took on two eschatologies in terms of the Soviet and American views of world order. With the fall of the Soviet Union and declaration of the ‘End of History’, a globalising Liberalism became the ultimate state of global human existence (Fukuyama 1992).

Cosmopolitan Globalism Rethought

Despite the promises of idealism, its true nature has brought a much different reality. What is driving the surge of nationalism across the world is that nations states are experiencing the multifaceted attack of geopolitical integration, the synthesis of domestic politics and internal cultural balkanization. I would argue that the combination of the loss of national sovereignty along with the dilution of domestic cultures has proven E.H. Carr correct: liberalism is utopian and therefore quixotic, as it fails to comprehend the workings of reality (Carr 1945, 20). In response to these challenges, the tenets of sovereignty are now in doubt and the reconsideration of monoculture and the nation state are now afoot.

The results of globalization have proven to be the erosion of the power and independence of the state. This has been discussed by Susan Strange, who has stated that political authority has shifted from nation states to both intergovernmental and nongovernmental organizations (Strange 1996). She went further in The Retreat of the State that heads of governments have lost their power and thus no longer can truly offer solutions to problems that may concern their fellow countrymen (Strange 1996). She goes on to say that from the time of Thucydides, there was the assumption that domestic sovereignty would be regulated according to each state by their peers. Now it is believed that sovereignty is nothing more than a courteous pretence (Strange 1996). The conclusion reached by Strange is that a vacuum of power has now emerged, as international relations have now become a zero-sum game as the diffusion of authority away from national governments has left a yawning hole of non-authority and ungovernance (Strange 1996).

From a cultural standpoint, it also appears that nationalism has been pulled into a clash of civilizations. However, I would note that this battle consists of two fronts: by globalism and by multiculturalism. The artificial culture of globalism has been studied by George Ritzer, who has stated in Globalization of Nothing that the uniqueness of humanity has been stripped and replaced with ‘nothing’. This has seen five aspects that ‘nothingness’ impacting particular cultures: the lacking of distinctive substance, uniqueness being supplanted by the generic, local ties being cut, things of a specific time period are replaced by the timeless quality of nothingness and the dehumanization of human relationships (Ritzer 2003).

It was in The Disuniting of America by Schlesinger that the dangers of how multiculturalism could cause the disintegration of a society were put forth. These dangers come forward by those who denounce the ideal of the American melting pot and thus the idea of a single people (Oshinsky, 1992). This is achieved by the worship of a ‘cult of ethnicity’ by those who protect, promote and perpetuate separate ethnic and racial communities that nourishes prejudices, magnifies differences and stirs antagonism (Oshinsky, 1992). This erodes what made America unique, which was the ability to forge a single nation from peoples of remarkably diverse racial, religious and ethic origins. However, with the rise of cultural pluralism, despite its altruistic intentions, has assaulted nationalism to its core and twisted its meaning to solely represent imperialism, cruelty and ethno-superiority. Ironically, it has been the duel assault by the opposing forces of generic globalism along with the hyper-difference of multiculturalism that has led to nations rebelling and seeking a restoration of national sovereignty and their cultural heritage. Minor parties and movements surging in unprecedented support in various countries across the globe have reflected this non-violent revolt. However this neo-nationalism is not a monolithic creed, as I contend that there are two wings of this realist insurgency: the civic-patriotism and the nationalistic populism.

The Rise of Nationalistic False Prophets and the Patriotic Alternative  

Due to the all-encompassing nature of globalism, the revolt against liberalism has simultaneously taken place in various countries across the planet. It has been particular present in Anglo-Saxon nations as represented by Britain voting to withdraw from the European Union and the Presidential campaign of Donald Trump. This revolt even show signs in Australia with the political comeback of Pauline Hanson’s One Nation party.

According to the in-depth research by Robert Ford in Revolt of the Right, the support base for this revolt is due to globalization creating a post-industrial economy that prioritized corporate jobs, training and professional qualifications (Ford 2014, 112). The residual affect has been the growth of a more financially secure, highly educated, socially liberal middle class and the adoption of new values such as environmentalism, human rights and social justice and the shrinking of the traditional working class (Ford 2014, 113). This liberal-agenda saw the abandonment of the blue-collar working class as their historic political parties faced the dilemma of representing the shrinking working class and face political oblivion or reinvent themselves and represent the metropolitan globalized world by making peace with neoliberalism, deprioritize worker rights for public services and adopt multiculturalism instead of upholding traditionalism (Ford 2014, 113). I propose that this saw the ‘end of history’ and proved Strange correct in her declaration that the synthesis of politics has left a power vacuum as there is no longer any true philosophical opposition available for the citizenry to contemplate. This led the working class to shift their support to nationalistic parties that represented their interest and concerns such as national identity and the loss of sovereignty (Ford 2014, 114). I contend this is much more nuanced than it appears, as citizens are willing to ‘hold their nose’ and even vote for extreme parties if there is no other moderate alternative available.

An example of this occurring has been the rise in support for the British National Party and UKIP. The BNP being the successor to the neo-nazi National Front and was grounded in its tradition of ethic nationalism. They argued that British nationalism consisted of race and ancestry and therefore people of other origins could never truly be British. Furthermore, they argued that non-whites and immigration was threats to the existence of the British race and that multiculturalism would mitigate the purity of the Anglo-Saxon race itself. In regards to foreign policy, they advocated Hard Europeskpticism and wished to withdraw from the European Union as it infringed on their autonomy (Ford 2014, 23). This brand of nationalism began to gain traction with the public with the BNP and peaked in the 2009 European Election with winning almost one million votes and elected two members to the European Parliament (BNP secures two European seats, 2009). However BNP support was quickly siphoned by UKIP as they began to gain support and mainstream exposure by offering a form of non-racist, non-sectarian of civic-nationalism and libertarianism and wished to protect the public from big government, support free market capitalism and wished to free the UK from the European Union and restore national sovereignty and their cultural heritage (Ford 2014, 7). This led to the BNP to rapidly decline in support and implode as a force in British politics and be ultimately returned to the far-fringes of public debate. (Ford 2014, 89). Moreover, so impactful was UKIP’s brand of nationalism saw them win the 2014 European Elections (2014), become the third party of UK politics by winning 12.9% of the domestic vote, (Election 2015 Results’, 2016) forced the holding of the Brexit Referendum and ultimately vindicate their existence by persuading the British people to leave the EU (‘Brexit: David Cameron to quit after UK votes to leave EU’, 2016). I contend that this reflects the nuance of rise nationalism, as many supporters may affiliate themselves with the ideas of sovereignty and culture, there exists a strong repulsion for racism and extremism would allow them to support parties who espouse these concepts if no other alternative is available, but will quickly abandon them once a moderate option presents itself.

The character of US neo-nationalism followed a similar path of UKIP. Just like their British counterparts, the American people are willing to support the Trump phenomenon as it also represents a populist revolt, albeit more so against globalism rather than multiculturalism. However, this ideological battle did not from a third party, but through the power dynamics within the Republican Party. Although I argue that Trump is deeply flawed, the momentous support he has gathered transcends his candidacy and has reduced him to a figurehead of populist support for a people that support American idealism. Once consolidating control over the GOP, Trump declared the credo of ‘Americanism, not Globalism’ thus indicating his support for nationalism. In a recent speech he echoed the concerns of Susan Strange by stating: “Our movement is about replacing a failed and corrupt political establishment with a government controlled by the American people… we are at a crossroads for our civilization that will determine if we reclaim control over our government…the establishment is responsible for our disastrous trade deals, massive illegal immigration and economic a forging policy that has bled our country dry… the global power structure has robbed our working class, stripped our wealth and gave it to global special interests…this election will determine if we are a free nation or only have the illusion of democracy and controlled by a handful of global special interests” (Trump 2016).

As analysed by James Curran’s The Power of Speech, Australia has always held ambivalence relationship with its role on the world stage and with multiculturalism. The initial stages of the Australian experience was based upon ethnic nationalism, as it nurtured their identity and instilled a sense of membership of a wider Anglo-Saxon community which allowed them to self-identify with Britain and the British Empire (Curran 2004, 4). This saw both side of politics support the notions of the White Australia Policy that sought to maintain the protection and preservation of racial homogeneity across the continent (Curran 2004, 5). This became socio-political orthodoxy until the dawn of the 1970s where Gough Whitlam introduced multiculturalism, which was carried on by Malcolm Fraser, under the maxim of ‘New Nationalism’. This rejected Anglo-conformity and called for a new sense of identity, one that combined the political and cultural (Curran 2004, 124-125). As expressed in March of Patriots, this eventually resulted in the rise of Pauline Hanson and One Nation. She represented a sector of Australians, who felt abandoned by both Labour and the Coalition. Much like the BNP, she exploited the anger and resentment by manipulating the grievances, exploitation or rural resentment and racism (Kelly 2011, 366). She attacked global capital, Aboriginal rights, multiculturalism and political elitism (Kelly 2011, 368). At one point she came close to destroying the Howard government at the 1998 election by winning eight per cent of the primary vote (Kelly 2011, 366). However just like the BNP, she rapidly fell from grace and was exiled to the political wilderness. But in this period of neo-nationalism, I argue that due to the non-existence of a moderate civic political movement or party allowed the opportunity for Hanson to back a comeback, although this time mimicking UKIP’s civic nationalist stance and Trump’s anti-globalist rhetoric. This tactic paid dividends at the 2016 election by winning four percent nationwide for the Senate and four senate seats (2016). Furthermore, she has recently reportedly increased her national support by fourfold and almost doubled in her home state of Queensland (2016).

Towards a Better World?

In the quest to bring order to an anarchical world, liberalism bred the unintended consequence of totalitarianism. This created the erosive affects of globalization by formulating an international power vacuum, the standardization of politics and the destruction of cultural heritages. The reaction that transpired is the pushback, via nationalism, by those who seek a return of sovereignty and the restoration representative politics and cultural traditions. However, regardless of which type of neo-nationalism that may rise to prominence, I contend its impact will not disappear. In fact, I would argue that the world is in a state of counter-revolution, where the liberal world order is being replaced with the geopolitical framework of the English School of International Relations. Furthermore, the societal norm of multiculturalism is being ousted, not for racial nationalism, but for the homogeneous Melting Pot.

Despite the anarchical nature of world politics, nations are not are not inherently warlike and therefore would not require the stifling nature of global interdependency. The splendid medium can be achieved, where the realist notions of maintaining the sovereignty of different cultures, government and ways of life are upheld, while avoiding the temptation to turn inward and become seduced by notions of superiority (Bull 1977, 8). According to the co-founder of the English School, Hedley Bull, a peaceful co-existence between nations and civilizations can be obtained without having to assimilate cultures into a world state or allow a clash of civilizations to occur. Instead, Bull envisions an international society that would self-regulate a geopolitical order, nation states as there exists common interests among nations, rules that dictate certain behaviour patterns and institutions that assist in enforcing the rules (Bull 1977, 65). He suggests that this is achievable by the use of Neo-medievalism. By creating layered geopolitical order of international, national and subnational institutions, overlapping allegiances would hold nations to account without the need for world government (Bull 1977, 254-255).

In regards to culture, I contend that the philosophical framework of the Melting Pot provides a greater opportunity for the manifestation for a peaceful diverse society. Although multiculturalism may enjoy and appreciate different cultures, as previously indicated by Schlesinger, it can devolve into identity politics and national self-loathing (Caravantes 1992, 57). This can be avoided by embracing the notions of the Melting Pot. The main difference between the two cultural diversity theories is that the former states that a society should consist if many diverse social a cultural lifestyles and any enforcement of traditional norms is viewed as xenophobia (Orosco 2016). Conversely, the Melting Pot mentality is adhering to one norm based on the parent culture. Essentially, all people will blend together to form one basic culture (Orosco 2016). The best example of this theory is the Americanization Model, which states that US American identity is not determined by ethnicity or origins, but the adoption of the creed that all people, regardless of race, deserves liberty, equality, justice and fair treatment. This was to be what bonds a diverse people, despite racial, ethnic or cultural differences (Orosco 2016). Immigrants would willing discard their native identities by interacting with fellow immigrants and native citizens (Orosco 2016).

Conclusion

In conclusion, the rise of nationalism can be attributed to the hubris of the current liberal world order. By believing itself to be the End of History and condemning the ancien regime of nation states and monoculture, liberalism fermented resentment. By demonizing legitimate concerns, it ultimately started a counter-revolution by the world populace. It is this reason that the ideas advocated by the likes of Trump or Hanson should not be dismissed as their brand of nationalism can gain power if a moderate alternative is not available. Furthermore, the consequences of resurgent nationalism may prove to be beneficial to world peace, as it would allow national cultures to express themselves without being infringed by external forces.

– 2913 Words        

Bibliography

BNP secures two European seats, BBC (Online), Last Modified 2009. http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/uk_politics/8088381.stm

Bull, H (1977) The Anarchical Society, Macmillan Education Ltd, United Kingdom.

Butler, Josh. “One Nation Get Four Senators, As Full Senate Results Finally Released”, The Huffington Post. Last Modified August 04. 2016.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com.au/2016/08/03/one-nation-get-four-senators-as-full-senate-results-finally-rel/

Brexit: David Cameron to quit after UK votes to leave EU, BBC (Online), Last Modified 2016. http://www.bbc.com/news/uk-politics-36615028

Caravantes, E (1992) From Melting Pot to Witch’s Cauldron, Hamilton Books, United Kingdom.

Carr, E, H (1941) Twenty Years’ Crisis 1919-1939, Macmillan Education Ltd, United Kingdom.

Curran, J (2004) Power of Speech, Melbourne Press University Press, Australia

Election 2015 Results, BBC (Online), 7 May, 2015. http://www.bbc.com/news/election/2015/results

Ford, R (2014) Revolt on the Right, Routledge, United States.

Fukuyama, F (1992) End of History, Free Press, United States.

Huntingron, P, Samuel. The Clash of Civilizations, Foreign Affairs (1993): 22-49.

Ikenberry, J 2009, ‘Liberalism in a Realist World: International Relations as an American Scholarly Tradition’, International Studies, Vol. 46, No. 1&2, 203–219.

Kelly, P (2011) March of Patriots, Melbourne University Publishing Ltd, Australia.

Orosco, J (2016) Toppling the Melting Pot, Indiana University Press, United States.

Osborn, Andrew. “UK’s Eurosceptic UKIP party storms to victory in Europe vote.” Reuters. Last Modified May 26. 2014.

http://www.reuters.com/article/us-eu-elections-britain-idUSBREA4O0EM20140526

Oshinsky, D 1992, ‘The Cost of Ethnicity’, review of The Disuniting of America: Reflections on a Multicultural Society, by Arthur Schlesinger Jr, The New Leader, Vol. 75, No. 3 pp. 9-20, viewed 30 October 2016.

Post-election support for One Nation soars in the latest Newspoll results, News (Online), Last Modified October 17, 2016. http://www.news.com.au/national/politics/postelection-support-for-one-nation-soars-in-the-latest-newspoll-results/news-story/38ab8d493b78614712ecf9a3d287d607

Ritzer, G (2003) Globalization of Nothingness, University of Maryland MD

Strange, S. (1996) The Retreat of the State: The Diffusion of Power in the World State, Cambridge University Press, United States.

Trump, D 2016 ‘Donald Trump – Trump the Establishment – His Most Inspirational Speech’, viewed 1 November 2016,

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gS7uxYnwQqY

The Impact of modern Globalism

 

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The most concerning issue within modern international politics has been the totalitarian nature of Western-universalism. This may appear controversial, but upon further scrutiny the most impactful event has been the rejection of global-liberalism and the resurgence of nationalistic-realism.

In order to explain this occurrence, this paper will be separated into three sections: Firstly, in order to understand why the current rejection of liberalism, its ethos and how it came to dominate must be understood. Secondly, the alternative of realism will show why liberalism is being rejected. And finally, I show how the recent Brexit result exemplifies the authoritarianism of liberalism and the nationalistic reaction.

The Liberal Utopia

The notion of idealism has been championed under many different authors and banners throughout history. The intellectual architecture can be found in the works of Dante’s De Monarchia: humanity can only fulfil its rational urges by working towards a single government, therefore the concept of national sovereignty must be forgotten (Wight 1987, 226). It was 20th century Wilsonianism that gave idealism another political identity in the form of American liberalism. It was this ideological blueprint that saw the eventual implementation of interdependence, international law, democratic peace theory and the establishment of transnational/global organizations such as the IMF, WTO, EU, ICC, NATO, International law and the UN (Ikenberry 2009). However, it was not until the end of the Cold War that America achieved the unipolar moment and declared the ‘End of History’, that saw liberalism enforced via globalization (Fukuyama 2006). Essentially, globalization is the utopia goal of World Revolution, given a Western guise.

This was a perplexing position to take, as Western notions condemned such a worldview. But being that the US had also envisioned a standardized world of their own, as championed under President Wilson, it was unsurprising that a globalized world was believed inevitable. For instance, Alexander Wendt points out that the number of nations has already decreased from 600,000 to only 200 political units, the existence of the European Union as a prototype for globalism and the growing trend of countries now seek authorization of the United Nations to use force (Wendt 2015). This echoes the work of Kenichi Ohmae, which states the modern nation state, is out-dated to understand the threats and opportunities of a globalized world (Ohmae 1995, 59-60). In order to enter the liberal world order, national economies must adapt to the new circumstances, just as it had done from advancing from 19th century labour, to 20th century production it must enter the 21st century of information services (Ohmae 1995, 135). In regards to society, globalization will see the homogenization of cultures and thus the elimination of differences between nationalities or civilizations (Drezner 2010, 212). Furthermore, a world of nation states cannot fight transnational threats, as they possess obsolete tools, inadequate laws, inefficient bureaucratic arrangements and ineffective strategies (Naím 2003, 30). By creating such a unified world, certain transnational threats can finally be fought such as terrorism, climate change, global economics as well as drugs, arms trafficking intellectual property, people smuggling and money laundering (Naím 2003, 29).

Despite the humanitarianism of liberalism, the dismissal of nationalism and the declaration of the End-State have proven to carry the underpinnings of authoritarianism. Thus the world populace have instinctively recognized this fact and has drifted towards realism once again.

Realism Revisited

It was E.H.Carr who recognized idealistic nature within liberalism, and condemned it as utopian, as it misunderstood the existence of the nation state itself (Carr1945,). According to Carr, nationalism allowed the Hobbesian notion of sovereignty to flourish; therefore liberalism dismisses reality (Carr1945). I propose that due to this fundamental ideological flaw, liberalism is susceptible to the tendencies of enlightened tyranny.

The parallels between globalization and World Revolution were not been lost on scholars. Even Fukuyma conceded this by stating his declaration was ‘a kind of Marxist interpretation of history that leads to completely non-Marxist conclusion’ (Drezner 2010, 211). As Daniel Drezner points out, the end result of the withering away of the state, albeit through neoliberalism, has eroded nationalism as it weakens the independence of state institutions and the democratic principle (Drezner 2010, 212). It has established a plutocratic global class and thus seeks to destroy the idea of ‘society’ (Gilman 2014).

It is these reasons that spurred the current geopolitical re-alignment of rejecting liberalism and re-embraced realism. However, it would be mistaken to view the national resurgence as a return to power politics. I submit that the world population are not seeking a return to classical realism, but are demanding the vision of a world society based on the English School of International Relations. This outlook acknowledges the anarchical world and the various cultures, laws, history, government and national sovereignty (Bull 1977, 8). However, it is open to the liberal goal of international order and accepts common interests, rules and institutions yet repudiate an interdependent world (Bull 1977, 65).

Leviathan Reborn

It was the EU that sought to enact liberalism and provide a regional model for globalism. It created a cosmopolitan-Europe; national cultures were assimilated into a monoculture, know as the ‘Europeanism’. This was achieved by usurping all the symbols of statehood: money, economic system, national flags, rule of law (Ford 2014). In order to maintain political integrity all dissention was crushed. For example, when Greek PM Papandreou proposed a referendum, the EU responded by removing him from power (Roberts 2013, 161).

The reaction to the ever-increasing powers of the EU, member states have come to the same conclusion of Susan Strange: that international liberalism has forced the surrender of sovereignty and redistributed the power across the European Union and other transnational institutions (Strange 1996,45). There has now been a political revolt against the Eurozone via the ballot-box in support of Euroscepticism. The most notable example has been Britain’s UKIP successfully spearheading the vote to leave the European Union to reaffirm themselves as an independent, self-governing and outward-looking Britain (Green 2016).

Conclusion

The impact of the liberal totalitarian nature of globalization has been the most pressing issue since the end of the Cold War. Instead of ushering in a new era of peace, it has perpetuated tension and rebellion. In doing so, liberalism has ironically proved that not only are the reports leviathan’s death are greatly exaggerated, but also seems to be stumbling back onto its feet.

– 1048 words

Bibliography

Bull, H (1977) The Anarchical Society, Macmillan Education Ltd, United Kingdom.

Carr, E, H (1945) Nationalism, Macmillan Education Ltd, United Kingdom.

Daniel Drezner 2010, ‘Globalizers of the world, unite!’, The Washington Quarterly, Vol 21, No.1, pp. 207-225 

Ford, R (2014) Revolt on the Right, Routledge, United Kingdom.

Fukuyama, F (2006) End of History and the Last Man, Free Press, United States

Nils Gilman, The Twin Insurgency, The American Interest, Vol. 9, No. 6, Published on: June 15, 2014

Ikenberry, J 2009, ‘Liberalism in a Realist World: International Relations as an American Scholarly Tradition’, International Studies, Vol. 46, No. 1&2, 203–219.

Lord Green, “10 reasons why choosing Brexit on June 23 is a vote for a stronger, better Britain.” The Sun UK, Last modified June 22, 2016. https://www.thesun.co.uk/news/1278140/why-voting-to-leave-the-eu-will-save-our-sovereignty-rein-in-migration-and-boost-our-economy/

Ohmae, K (1995) The End of the Nation State, HarperCollins Publishers, United Kingdom

Roberts, C, P (2013) The End of Laissez Faire Capitalism, Clarity Press, United States.

Strange, S. (1996) The Retreat of the State: The Diffusion of Power in the World State, Cambridge University Press, United States.

Naím, M 2003, ‘The Five Wars of Globalization’, Foreign Policy, No. 134, pp. 28-37

Wendt, A 2014, The World State Debate, Online Video, March 16, 2014, viewed 18 August 2016, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZwgKUp_h1Mc

Wight, M 1987, ‘An Anatomy of International Thought’, Review of International Studies, Vol. 12, No. 3, pp. 221-227.

UKIP and the Path to Power

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The traditional perception of ‘strong leadership’ is the use of Hard Power. However, it will become apparent that Soft Power is the superior form of leadership.

In order to understand my thesis, this paper will use the issue of the European Union (EU) to exemplify the failure of Hard Power and the predominance of Soft Power. Firstly, in order to understand the concept of Power Dynamics, I will scrutinize the concept of Hard and Soft Power. Secondly, I will analyse the flaws of Hard Power through the sphere of the European Union. And finally, I will use the example of the rise and dominance of Britain’s United Kingdom Independence Party (UKIP) as a case of Soft Power dictating the agenda, despite the lack of ownership of any representation within elected office.

The Intricacies of Hard and Soft Power

Before advancing further, it is importance of understand the complexity of Power. According to Joseph Nye, power is split into the two predominate theories: Hard and Soft Power.

The former use the tactics of intimidation, manipulation and punishment. This type of persuasion seeks expel reason and autonomy by establishing a collective identity.[1] The political skill employed by this Power is ‘political intelligence’ that allows the sizing up weakness, insecurities, likes and dislikes of others and transforms them into personal devices.[2] This creates the ‘Great Intimidator’, which operates via intimidation and abuse to keep others unsteady and submissive.[3]

 

A proponent of Hard Power is Niccolò Machiavelli, who famously stated in The Prince that it was better to be feared than loved, but not to be feared to the point of being hated.[4] The rationalization of this advice is that commitments made in peace are not always kept, but if made in fear are kept out of fear. If fear becomes excessive the environment becomes dangerous for a ruling class.[5] Furthermore, he advised the conquering of Free States would require either ruin, the installment of colonies or maintain normalcy under a puppet government.[6]

The ladder seeks to set the agenda, leading by the example, inspiration and ideas.[7] This type of Power usually represented by charismatic leaders who are self-confident, conviction driven, enthusiastic in communication and the ability to create an emotional attraction for followers.[8] Essentially, it seeks to empower and elevate consciousness and transform ideals and values rather than hate and fear.[9]

The champion of Soft Power has been Antonio Gramsci who understood power comes from setting the agenda and determining the framework of debate.[10] It was within Letters from Prison, that he noted that cultural hegemony could be achieved via all the organs of civil society.[11] It was argued that the ruling class, possessing its own philosophy and personnel, renders ‘The Prince’ into a figurehead and thus can be replaced by a collective will with its own ‘new Prince’.[12] Only by being part of society and operating dialectically in relation to other parts that a new worldview can become dominate because it resonates with the active, conscious consensus of the masses. This ‘long march’ strategy would ensure the conquest of the mainstream and avoid coercion or revolution. [13]

Regardless of which type of Power is employed, the one aspect that can affect its efficiency is Contextual Intelligence. This indicates a capacity to foresee trends through complexity and adaptability while simultaneously attempting to shape events.[14] Without contextual intelligence, being a strongman is not enough.[15]

 

The Authoritarianism of European Hard Power

It was President Teddy Roosevelt that famously articulated the notion of Hard Power by saying “speak softly, and carry a big stick”. This concept meant that when diplomacy failed, then it was time to use the threat of military, economic or political punishment is established.[16] I would submit that this has become the unofficial policy of the EU towards its own population.

The founder of the EU was Jean Monnet, who realized the idea of United Europe could be manifested into reality if the Wilsonian principles of neoliberal capitalism, democracy, intervention and interdependence were adopted. For Monnet, it was economics that was the essence of Euro-integration.[17] It was through the use of Soft Power tactics of vision, diplomacy and creating an emotional bond with supporters that this idealistic agenda progressed without any strong resistance, but when the geopolitical context changed, the European Union shifted towards the use of ‘the big stick’, and in doing so, ignored the council of Machiavelli and became hated by the various peoples of Europe.

By adopting Machiavellianism, the EU saw the conquering of Free States by reducing Euro-Nations into protectorates and elected government into puppet states via the means of economics and politics. Although there were many examples of this occurring, such as dismissing the referendum results Netherlands and Ireland in regards to the ratification of the 2009 Lisbon Treaty[18], the most contentious period came during the Greek Sovereign Debt Crisis. Despite being prohibited to finance deficits of member nations, the EU partly wrote off some public debt and imposed neoliberal restructuring and austerity measures.[19] This meant wages, pensions and employment was reduced along with the forced sale of public resources and national heritage Islands.[20] In response to these dictates, the Greek people revolted and in order punish and disciple the Hellenic people, nearly all use of Soft Power was disregarded. In order to placate the tensions, PM Papandreou proposed a national referendum to vote on the bailout scheme and was met with his removal from office and a EU selected replacement.[21] When the new Tsipras Government’s 2016 Referendum resulted in 60% rejection of neoliberalism, in order to maintain the collective identity a unified Europe, the EU Establishment transformed into the Great Intimidator and sought to discipline and publish the Greece and forced them into submitting into accepting further imposed austerity measures.[22]

The second concern facing the EU is the Migrant Crisis that has seen the influx of mass migration from the devastated countries of the Middle East. Although the initial response was humane, it soon became apparent that accepting so many people increased further economic strain and cultural and national security tensions. These concerns accumulated in the mass sexual assault of German women during the 2016 New Year celebrations[23] and the French terrorist attacks as seen in Nice.[24] In response to concerns of citizens, Europhile government, such as German, denounced their own citizenry as the philosophical decedents of Nazis.[25] I would argue that the duel Crisis was an indication of the EU lacking Contextual Intelligence as it failed to foresee the escalating hatred and growing support for Euroskepticism.

The Potentiality of Eurosceptic Soft Power

The European integration agenda has always been resisted and relegated to the fringes of extreme politics. However, there existed a moderate strain of Euroskepticism that consisted of national patriotism, sovereignty, independence and the democratic principle. In order to shift the perception of Europskepticism, it faced the monumental task of overcoming the traditional worldview of public opinion, media, social movements and national political parties[26]. Ironically, the nationalistic Eurosceptic Movement owns its success to the long-march of Gramscianism.

It was the establishment of Ukip, under the magnetic leadership of Nigel Farage, that managed to set the national agenda and move Euroskepticism from the far fringes of debate into mainstream public discourse. The style of leadership exhibited by Farage was transformational variety that expressed a clear, compelling vision of the future and inspired followers.[27] I draw parallels with Farage and former Australian PM Keating’s ‘Placido Domingo’ philosophy: to walk on the stage and offer a performance to entice the audience to swoon through courage and imagination.[28] By using a combination of education and abuse, known as the ‘Farage Barage’, he managed to expose the technocracy, cronyism, anti-nationalism and lack of democracy to become an Internet sensation.[29] This enabled him to frame the debate as pro-Europeans seeking to undermine the history, character and morale of Great Britain and his campaign to ‘Believe in Britain’, which consisted of self-governance, controlled immigration, national sovereignty, international free trade and the support for its heritage.[30]

By ‘winning hearts and minds’, Ukip saw growing public support from middle-class Conservatives and working class Old Labour voters.[31] This accumulated in beating Britain’s Two Major Parties by winning the 2014 European Elections.[32] This momentum continued into domestic politics with the self-appointed ‘People’s Army’ marching on to solidified their position as the UK’s Third Party by gaining 12.9% of the National vote. But due to the First-Past-the-Post system, only saw one seat gained in Parliament.[33] Although this was disappointing, the overwhelming strength of Soft Power saw to the dictation of the agenda, thus pressuring elected officials and empowering Eurosceptic conservatives, and forced the Tory Government to hold the Brexit Referendum or fear losing further support to Ukip. Finally, the result vindicated their existence with, not only having the British people voting to leave the European Union, but Europhile Prime Minister David Cameron step down from power.[34]

Conclusion

In conclusion, as affirmed by the ideological ‘Battle for Britain’, Joseph Nye is correct in his statement that Soft Power can be more powerful than Hard Power. It was only by being seduced by Machiavelli that the European Project turned away from the Gramsci method and thus lost control of the European Project. Contrasty, it was rejecting Hard Power, that Ukip could bully the entrenched political class into submission by dominating the national discourse and untimely achieve its raison d’être.

 

Bibliography

“Big Stick Diplomacy.” Gale Encyclopedia of U.S. Economic History. 1999. Encyclopedia.com. (September 11, 2016). http://www.encyclopedia.com/doc/1G2-3406400096.html

“Brexit: David Cameron to quit after UK votes to leave EU”, BBC (Online), 24 June 2016. http://www.bbc.com/news/uk-politics-36615028

“Election 2015 Results”, BBC (Online), 7 May, 2015. http://www.bbc.com/news/election/2015/results

Farage, N (2011) Flying Free, Biteback Publishing, United Kingdom

Ford, R (2014) Revolt on the Right, Routledge, United States

German politician Gregor Gysi calls native Germans ‘Nazis’ and their extinction ‘Fortunate’ (2015) Retrieved from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=encjlpMxD0Q

Gramsci, A (1975) Letters from Prison, Lowe & Brydone Ltd, United Kingdom

Hooghe, Liesbet. What Drives Euroskepticism?, European Union Politics 8, No. 1 (2007): 5-12.

Kelly, P (2011) March of Patriots, Melbourne University Publishing Ltd, Australia

Machiavelli, N (2011) The Prince, Penguin Books, United Kingdom

Marans, Daniel. “German-Led Eurozone Launching Coup Against Greek Government”, The Huffington Post Australia (Online), Last modified July 17, 2015.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com.au/entry/thisisacoup_n_7781736.html?section=australia

Newton, Jennifer. “Nearly 200 sexual offences have been carried out on migrants by fellow refugees in asylum centers in just one German state alone in six months, politician reveals”, Daily Mail (Online), Last Modified September 9,2016. http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3780047/Nearly-200-sexual-offences-carried-migrants-fellow-refugees-asylum-centres-just-one-German-state-six-months-politician-reveals.html

“Nice attack death toll rises to 86 as injured man dies”, BBC (Online), Last modified August 19, 2016. http://www.bbc.com/news/world-europe-37137816

Nye, J (2008) Powers to Lead, Oxford University Press, United States

Oakden, Paul. “Believe in Britain. Together we can do great things.” UKIP Website. Last modified March 18, 2015. http://www.ukip.org/believe_in_britain_together_we_can_do_great_things

Osborn, Andrew. “UK’s Eurosceptic UKIP party storms to victory in Europe vote.” Reuters. Last Modified May 26. 2014.

http://www.reuters.com/article/us-eu-elections-britain-idUSBREA4O0EM20140526

Paterson, Josephine, Leadership Styles and Theories, Nursing Standard 27, no.

41 (2013): 35-39.

Roberts, C, P (2013) The End of Laissez Faire Capitalism, Clarity Press, United States

Ugland, Trygve. “Placing the Supranational Politics of Jean Monnet in Time.” International Journal of Canadian Studies 47, (2013): 171-186.

[1] Joseph Nye, Powers to Lead, Oxford University Press (United States, 2008), 142.

[2] Joseph Nye, Powers to Lead, Oxford University Press (United States, 2008), 81.

[3] Joseph Nye, Powers to Lead, Oxford University Press (United States, 2008), 80-81.

[4] Niccolo Machiavelli, The Prince, Penguin Books (United Kingdom, 2011), 59

[5] Niccolo Machiavelli, The Prince, Penguin Books (United Kingdom, 2011), 57

[6] Niccolo Machiavelli, The Prince, Penguin Books (United Kingdom, 2011), 18.

[7] Joseph Nye, Powers to Lead, Oxford University Press (United States, 2008), 29.

[8] Joseph Nye, Powers to Lead, Oxford University Press (United States, 2008), 55.

[9] Joseph Nye, Powers to Lead, Oxford University Press (United States, 2008), 62.

[10] Joseph Nye, Powers to Lead, Oxford University Press (United States, 2008), 308.

[11] Antonio Gramsci, Letters from Prison, Lowe & Brydone Ltd (United Kingdom, 1975), 42.

[12] Antonio Gramsci, Letters from Prison, Lowe & Brydone Ltd (United Kingdom, 1975), 50.

[13] Antonio Gramsci, Letters from Prison, Lowe & Brydone Ltd (United Kingdom, 1975), 51.

[14] Joseph Nye, Powers to Lead, Oxford University Press (United States, 2008), 88.

[15] Joseph Nye, Powers to Lead, Oxford University Press (United States, 2008), 88.

[16] “Big Stick Diplomacy.” Last Modified 2000. http://www.encyclopedia.com/doc/1G2-3406400096.html

[17] Trygve Ugland, Placing the Supranational Politics of Jean Monnet in Time, International Journal of Canadian Studies, 2013, 180.

[18] Nigel Farage, Flying Free, Biteback Publishing (United Kingdom, 2011), 221-222.

[19] Paul Craig Roberts, The End of Laissez Faire Capitalism, Clarity Press (United State, 2013),160

[20] Paul Craig Roberts, The End of Laissez Faire Capitalism, Clarity Press (United State, 2013),160.

[21] Paul Craig Roberts, The End of Laissez Faire Capitalism, Clarity Press (United State, 2013), 161.

[22] Daniel Marans, “German-Led Eurozone Launching Coup Against Greek Government”, The Huffington Post Australia (Online), July 17, 2015.

[23] Jennifer Newton,“Nearly 200 sexual offences have been carried out on migrants by fellow refugees in asylum centers in just one German state alone in six months, politician reveals”, Daily Mail (Online). September 9,2016.

[24] Nice attack death toll rises to 86 as injured man dies, BBC (Online). August 19, 2016.

[25]German politician Gregor Gysi calls native Germans ‘Nazis’ and their extinction ‘Fortunate” Last Modified 2015. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=encjlpMxD0Q

[26] Liesbet Hooghe, What Drives of Euroskepticism European Union Politics. 2007, 5.

[27] Josephine Paterson, Leadership Styles and Theories Nursing Standard. 2013. 36.

[28] Paul Kelly, March of Patriots, Melbourne University Publishing Ltd (Australia, 2011), 93

[29] Nigel Farage, Flying Free, Biteback Publishing (United Kingdom, 2011), 193.

[30] Oakden, P 2015, Believe in Britain. Together we can do great things, viewed 1 September 2016, http://www.ukip.org/believe_in_britain_together_we_can_do_great_things

[31] Robert Ford, Revolt on the Right, Routledge (United States, 2014), 269-270.

[32] Andrew Osborn, “UK’s Eurosceptic UKIP party storms to victory in Europe vote”, Reuters. May 26. 2014. http://www.reuters.com/article/us-eu-elections-britain-idUSBREA4O0EM20140526

[33]Election 2015 Results”, BBC, Last Modified 2015. http://www.bbc.com/news/election/2015/results

[34] “Brexit: David Cameron to quit after UK votes to leave EU”, BBC (Online), Last Modified 2016. http://www.bbc.com/news/uk-politics-36615028

National Sovereignty & Non-State Actors

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The impact of shared-sovereignty upon nationalism is contested within academia, wondering if it undermines, increases or transforms nation states within a globalized world. It is my contention that non-state actors have ultimately undermined national sovereignty itself.

The Historical Narrative

In order to comprehend the concept, it is best to briefly understand its foundations and its connection to neoliberalism.

During and post-WWII the economic theory of Keynesianism was championed by many Western countries. However by the 1980’s, disillusionment with interventionism arose and was replaced by the creed of neoliberalism. The Reagan-Thatcher Administrations spearheaded it: this saw privatization, deregulating industries and international free trade.[1] This saw the redefinition of public-private spheres; with ‘public’ being considered to be government and ‘private’ are corporations.[2]

By 2000, the global market was skewed towards the interests of multinational corporations with its oligopolistic completion is often constrained and aimed at controlling national governments.[3] I would suggest that this established universal corporatism.

The Corporate World

The traditional role of the state has always been a source of governance, however this has seen its power slowly usurped by non-state actors.[4]

With no alterative available, it appears that the bi-polar world was replaced by a new post-liberal order.[5] This order originates in the West, it incorporates neoliberal principals. This implies this newfound ‘Corporate State’ has taken neoliberalism to the extreme, thus transforming it into authoritarian corporatism, working through multinationals such as the IMF and transnational entities like the European Union. This means that the neoliberal concepts became imposed from an international level.[6]

The implication of the Corporate State is that authority resides in offshore institutions. This private authority usurps national legitimacy and creates rules, principals, norms and regulations that must be adopted by governments.[7] It defines and prioritizes issues and present solutions to problems along with designed, adopted and implement their own rules and regulations.[8] Furthermore, they are motivated by the avoidance of activist and NGO scrutiny, appease investors and to create a standardized operating system.[9] The concern of lack of accountability is pacified by the promise of self-regulation that even extends between firms, governments and civil society via public-private partnerships.[10]

However, I would argue that the West is unfairly demonized as transgressions also fell upon Western countries. The abovementioned entities may be superficially thought of Western, but in reality they are no longer dependent upon their home counties. They are now manifesting within a transnational networks and sharing regulation and governance.[11]

The European Example

The Eurozone is facing a breakup due to the backlash by rediscovered nationalism by various countries due to rebelling against the sovereignty-killing aspect of liberal-corporatism. The bailouts of Greece, Ireland and Spain, accompanied interest rates paid by nations on their actions, cut in spending and increase in taxation.[12] These polices were applied by the transnational institution of the IMF which saw Euro institutions collapsed by 2011 which saw the Euro-commission appoint technocratic governments such as Italy and Greece.[13]

In conclusion, by non-state actors via neoliberalism appears to have transcend nationalism itself. Furthermore, it adopted authoritarian characteristics that created a hubris that made it believe that it could regulate and police itself. As seen in the European example, by having such freedom and power the nation state has become eroded by transnational entities.

Bibliography

Elbra, A.D. (2014), “Interests Need Not be Pursued if they can be Created: Private Governance in African Gold Mining”, Business and Politics, Vol.16, No.2, pp.247-266.

Haufler, V. (2006), “Global Governance and the Private Sector,” in May, C. ed., Global Corporate Power, Boulder: Lynne Rienner Publishers.

Wilks, S. (2013), The Political Power of the Business Corporation, Cheltenham: Edward Elgar, ch.7.

[1] Virginia Haufler, (2006), Global Governance and the Private Sector, Boulder: Lynne Rienner Publishers. p. 90.

[2] Virginia Haufler, (2006), Global Governance and the Private Sector, Boulder: Lynne Rienner Publishers. p. 92.

[3] Stephen Wilks, (2013), The Political Power of the Business Corporation, Cheltenham: Edward Elgar, ch.7. p. 150.

[4] Ainsley D. Elbra, (2014), Interests Need Not be Pursued if they can be Created: Private Governance in African Gold Mining, Business and Politics, Vol.16, No.2, pp.247-266. p.249.

[5] Stephen Wilks, (2013), The Political Power of the Business Corporation, Cheltenham: Edward Elgar, ch.7. p.148.

[6] Stephen Wilks, (2013), The Political Power of the Business Corporation, Cheltenham: Edward Elgar, ch.7. p.149.

[7] Ainsley D. Elbra, (2014), Interests Need Not be Pursued if they can be Created: Private Governance in African Gold Mining, Business and Politics, Vol.16, No.2, pp.247-266. p.250.

[8] Ainsley D. Elbra, (2014), Interests Need Not be Pursued if they can be Created: Private Governance in African Gold Mining, Business and Politics, Vol.16, No.2, pp.247-266. p.255.

[9] Ainsley D. Elbra, (2014), Interests Need Not be Pursued if they can be Created: Private Governance in African Gold Mining, Business and Politics, Vol.16, No.2, pp.247-266. p.259.

[10] Ainsley D. Elbra, (2014), Interests Need Not be Pursued if they can be Created: Private Governance in African Gold Mining, Business and Politics, Vol.16, No.2, pp.247-266. p.255.

[11] Stephen Wilks, (2013), The Political Power of the Business Corporation, Cheltenham: Edward Elgar, ch.7. p.166.

[12] Stephen Wilks, (2013), The Political Power of the Business Corporation, Cheltenham: Edward Elgar, ch.7. p.160.

[13] Stephen Wilks, (2013), The Political Power of the Business Corporation, Cheltenham: Edward Elgar, ch.7. p.160.

The Power of Patriotic Economics

Economic-nationalism.jpg.w560h282

Being a developing country, this government is presented with the opportunity to choose which economic model to champion.

The Neoliberal Option

The narrative of internationalized capitalism, as espoused by Thomas Friedman, is that globalization is inevitable and thus all counties will ultimately don the laissez-faire ‘Golden Straightjacket’. This entailed privatization of state-owned enterprises, maintains low inflation, reduction of government, liberalize trade, deregulation, floating the dollar, balance the budget and privatization.[1] It will become apparent that this concept excuses many side-affects of such an economic theory.

According to neoliberalism, despite the goal of achieving national self-sufficiency, nationalization will lead to ruin.[2] The concerns of globalization, among many, are de-industrialization, labour exploitation, and the localized alternative is unfounded. The first is considered to be a ‘pauper labour argument’, which claims that high-income economies cannot compete with low wage mass Chinese workers.[3] This anti-competitive mindset refuses to realize that China is benefiting from high-income countries that make goods and services the Chinese wish to buy and vice-versa. Trade is not a zero-sum game, but is mutually enriching.[4] In regards to labour, it is proposed that the success of developing countries is built on exploitation.[5] This is considered to be unfair, as it will establish industry and force the economy to experience rapid growth and ultimately liberate the rural peasantry and offer social mobility.[6] The imposition of protectionism and trade union bargaining power will block industrialization and lead to unemployment.[7] Finally, localization is viewed as ‘new millennium collectivism’, which will see four major consequences. Firstly, subsistence farming risk harvest failure, localized economies will destroy the surrounding environment, downward efficiency due to a lack of competition and finally a collapse in trade.[8] Essentially, nationalization is considered utopian and thus will lead to mutually assured impoverishment and tyranny.[9]

As explained above, neoliberalism will excuse any misfortune, including labour exploitation, as long the result is an improved economy.

The Economic Nationalist Alternative

Despite the neoliberal declarations, they have proven to be a failure themselves. By lowering tariffs, nations suffered from a stagnating economy and growth lower than the days of protectionism.[10] Essentially, nationalism has seen developing countries advance by using protection, subsides and other government interventions, as seen in Singapore, India, China and South Korea.[11]

For instance, independent South Korea developed their own policy: high levels of tariffs and non-tariff barrier, public ownership of large segments of banking and industry, export subsides, domestic-content requirements, patent and copyright infringements and restrictions on capital flows.[12] India also gained economic success via protectionism, by imposing server restrictions on foreign investment, entry and ownership restrictions, and performance requirements.[13]

The examples of the Asian Financial crisis and Chile exemplify this argument. Those Asian nations that resisted neoliberalism, not only survived the crash relatively unscathed, but also are now thriving.[14] Contrastingly, neoliberal Chile lost its manufacturing ability and is now reliant on natural-resources-based exports and cannot move towards higher-productivity activities and thus suffers from a limited of prosperity.[15]

Conclusion

In conclusion, the argument of neoliberalism is an inversion of reality. It espouses the worldview of a benevolent tyranny, for it promotes the creed of the greater good. Comparatively, countries that resisted such economics and retained national independence, are further advanced and can survive and recover from global financial crisis much better than their neoliberal counterparts. Therefore, I will strongly suggest the nationalist approach.

[1] Ha-Joon Chang, (2008) Bad Samaritans: The Myth of Free Trade and the Secret History of Capitalism, New York: Bloomsbury Press, Chapter 1. p. 20.

[2] Martin Wolf, (2004), Why Globalisation Works, New Haven and London: Yale University Press, Chapter 10. p. 174.

[3] Martin Wolf, (2004), Why Globalisation Works, New Haven and London: Yale University Press, Chapter 10. p. 175.

[4] Martin Wolf, (2004), Why Globalisation Works, New Haven and London: Yale University Press, Chapter 10. p. 180.

[5] Martin Wolf, (2004), Why Globalisation Works, New Haven and London: Yale University Press, Chapter 10. p. 185.

[6] Martin Wolf, (2004), Why Globalisation Works, New Haven and London: Yale University Press, Chapter 10. p. 185.

[7] Martin Wolf, (2004), Why Globalisation Works, New Haven and London: Yale University Press, Chapter 10. p. 187.

[8] Martin Wolf, (2004), Why Globalisation Works, New Haven and London: Yale University Press, Chapter 10. p. 195-198.

[9] Martin Wolf, (2004), Why Globalisation Works, New Haven and London: Yale University Press, Chapter 10. p. 199.

[10] Martin Wolf, (2004), Why Globalisation Works, New Haven and London: Yale University Press, Chapter 10. p.199.

[11] Ha-Joon Chang, (2008) Bad Samaritans: The Myth of Free Trade and the Secret History of Capitalism, New York: Bloomsbury Press, Chapter 1. p. 29-30.

[12] Dani Rodrik, (2001), “Trading in Illusions”, Foreign Policy, Issue 123, March/April. p.59.

[13] Ha-Joon Chang, (2008) Bad Samaritans: The Myth of Free Trade and the Secret History of Capitalism, New York: Bloomsbury Press, Chapter 1. p. 30.

[14] Ha-Joon Chang, (2008) Bad Samaritans: The Myth of Free Trade and the Secret History of Capitalism, New York: Bloomsbury Press, Chapter 1. p. 29.

[15] Ha-Joon Chang, (2008) Bad Samaritans: The Myth of Free Trade and the Secret History of Capitalism, New York: Bloomsbury Press, Chapter 1. p. 31.

My Thoughts on Brexit

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After studying, reading, writing and discussing the end of the EU, both academically and personally, for the past eight years I am absolutely overjoyed the Brexit outcome!!!

The authoritarian-technocratic nature of the EU has revealed itself in its behavior many times before. For example, when nations, such as the Dutch,

Ireland and France who voted ‘No’ to the ratification of the 2009 Lisbon Treaty, they were forced to do it again until they voted ‘Yes’. Later, Italy had their own democratically elected leader dismissed and a EU puppet leader, Mario Monti, imposed upon them. Same thing happened in Greece and they even recently had their 2015 Referendum to reject the bailouts ignored. The idea of the EU is to standardize the continent, as Henry Kissinger has said ‘Who do I call if I want to call Europe?’ meaning he just wanted an EU President and not deal with all the other Heads of States of the various Euro nations. I always found it strange that after fighting WWII and even risked nuclear annihilation with the USSR, that there are those in the West that wants to adopt the rebranded concept of a forcibly unified Europe.

The experiment of Euro-collectivism has failed and is being rejected. Now it is the concept of national sovereignty and democracy has been remembered and is reasserting itself. Much like the Ancient Greeks who supported a benevolent tyranny, but as soon as that tyrant become authoritarian, they soon remembered their democratic principles and then got rid of him, I think this is happening within the EU Establishment and its Member States.

Britain is just the beginning, as I think will see many other Euro nations will follow. For instance, Rome just elected its first female mayor, who represents the Eurosceptic 5 Star Movement, is a huge blow the Renzi Government and could be the next country to leave. But it is more than about Europe. I think we could be witnessing a major reshuffling of world politics. It is going to be a similar period of turmoil as the world goes through realigning itself, much like the aftermath of the Second World War and the Cold War. This is really a non-violent revolution against the idea of a standardized globalized world, which is also reflected in the condemnation of the TPP, TIPP and perpetual warfare to forcefully impose a certain economic, political and cultural mindset.

One of the problems is that the faction of the Remain camp rejects the very existence of nation states and view nationalism to automatically support a variant of Fascism or the ethno-nationalism of Hitlerism. This is a mistake. It was socialist George Orwell who distinguished the difference of nationalism and patriotism: nationalism is the pursuit of power and makes the individual assimilate their very identity into the state. Contrastingly, it is patriotism that possesses a devotion to a particular place and way of life and is militarily neutral and culturally defensive, not offensive.

In regards to Scotland and Ireland now wanting to leave the United Kingdom and join the EU, I would not recommend them jumping onto a sinking ship but it is their choice to do so. However, if they do split from the UK but not join the EU, it would fit the period of a transforming geopolitical world and they may reinvent their relationship with England. Could it be a relationship closer of that of Canada and America? I am not sure, as I don’t have an in-depth knowledge of Scottish and Irish politics.

The geopolitical world has never to static. We have experience a period of imperialism and empire, aggressive nationalism and now globalism. I hope we are entering the Age of the English School of International Relations – various cultures of the world, reflected by the nation states living in an international, not globalized, world: A society of nations, supporting non-intervention, each communicating, sharing, trading, travelling, and inspiring one another and thus humanity can enter some form of relative world peace.

Finally, to those who voted ‘Out’ but didn’t realize what they were voting for or what the EU even was – what else can I say – how stupid are they? After months of intense debate, they had plenty of time to educate themselves before voting. It is up to them to take the initiative and learn what is happening around them. Such idiocy is beyond me…

No matter what happens – hold on to your hats, it’s going to be a bumpy ride!